Heating

Energy can be saved most effectively where consumption in the home is greatest: when heating. Many possibilities for saving on heating energy involve technical and physical building work. However, anyone can adjust their habits to help prevent energy being lost unnecessarily.

At night you can reduce the room temperature by up to 5° C. You can already start turning the heat down one or two hours before going to bed.

Heating costs rise along with the room temperature. Heating costs increase by about 6 per cent per degree. Every degree lower helps save on energy and costs.

The air needs to get out …

  • Radiators must be bled regularly. Once a radiator starts to “gurgle” or when the heat distribution across the radiator is very uneven, that is definitely the time.
  • Heating pipes in unheated rooms such as the cellar are not insulated, particularly in older buildings. It is worth remedying this and getting them insulated.
  • Heating systems should be professionally inspected regularly. Modern circulation pumps require less energy.

Hot water

Besides heating, most energy in the home is required for the provision of hot water. Everyone in the household uses, on average, between 30 to 50 litres of hot water daily. More than half of this is accounted for by baths and showers. A further quarter is used in the kitchen and for cleaning the home, with the remainder being used in wash basins.

  • Do not set the temperature of hot water tanks any higher than necessary, because the heat losses increase in relative terms along with the temperature difference to the ambient air.
  • It is worth switching off hot water tanks if you are going to be absent for an extended period or when you go on holiday.

A water tap should not drip. Even at a rate of one drop per second, 20 litres of water are lost in 24 hours, equivalent to two buckets per day. If possible, use ceramic seals on your taps. These are wear-free.

Better a warm shower than a hot bath

  • Showering instead of taking a bath not only saves energy, it also saves up to 70 per cent in water.
  • Water must not flow all the time. For example, the water tap can remain off while soaping up under the shower or when cleaning your teeth.
  • Do not set the temperature of hot water tanks any higher than necessary, because the heat losses increase in relative terms along with the temperature difference to the ambient air.
  • It is worth switching off hot water tanks if you are going to be absent for an extended period or when you go on holiday.

Hot water all the time

  • Rarely used taps, for example in the guest room WC, are most efficiently supplied by small electric water heaters.
  • Electronic water heaters provide not just a high level of comfort, they are also up to 20 percent more economical in terms of power consumption than the usual hydraulic water heaters.
  • The water temperature can be adjusted more quickly with single-lever mixers instead of taps with two handles. This saves both water and energy.

Use free solar energy, for example with solar collectors on the roof. A solar system of this type can cover about half of your hot water needs. Electronic water heaters and small storage heaters supplement the solar collectors to give you a complete and energy-efficient hot water supply. Another environmentally-friendly alternative for heating and a hot water supply is the heat pump. It uses environmental energy particularly efficiently.

A comparison between showering and taking a bath: Water temperature 37° C (electric heating)
Water consumptionPower consumption
Full bath120 to 150 l4 to 5 kWh
Shower30 to 50 l1 to 1.7 kWh

Heating correctly

Energy can be saved most effectively where consumption in the home is greatest: when heating. Many possibilities for saving on heating energy involve technical and physical building work. However, anyone can adjust their habits to help prevent energy being lost unnecessarily.

At night you can reduce the room temperature by up to 5° C. You can already start turning down the heat one or two hours before going to bed.

Heating costs rise along with the room temperature. Heating costs increase by about 6 per cent per degree. Every degree lower helps save on energy and costs.

The air needs to get out

  • Radiators must be bled regularly. Once a radiator starts to “gurgle” or when the heat distribution across the radiator is very uneven, that is definitely the time.
  • Heating pipes in unheated rooms such as the cellar are not insulated, particularly in older buildings. It is worth remedying this and getting them insulated.
  • Do not allow curtains and net curtains to hang down in front of radiators, as they prevent a lot of heat from being released into the room air and result in a greater heat loss via the windows.
  • Programmable thermostat valves are worth having. They regulate the temperature to suit your needs. For example the temperature is reduced during working hours and increased in the evening, and is then lowered again automatically during the night.
  • Thermostat valves must not be covered so that they can register the room temperature.
  • Keep the doors of heated rooms closed.
  • Close the roller blinds in the evening. This reduces the loss of heat to outside the room.
  • With electric heaters: Use direct heaters in rarely used rooms. Underfloor heating is a good solution in bathrooms.
  • Heating systems should be professionally inspected regularly. Modern circulation pumps require less energy.
Guideline values for pleasant and appropriate room temperatures
Living room20 - 22° C
Bedroom16 - 18° C
Children's rooms20° C
Bathroom22 - 24° C
Kitchen18° C
Hallways16 - 18° C